False-eye Puffer

Sep 08,  · When I was checking on my blue spot puffer he was nowhere to be found. Guess he got lonely cuz I looked and looked like an idiot and he was just to my left area in my main tank staring at me like a puppy. Somehow he jumped out of my overflow area and up into my main tank.

I am seriously considering giving it a try in my new The crazy thing also eats flake, nori and pretty much anything I put in the tank. I have google as well. Find More Posts by Regal

Canthigaster solandri Blue Dot Puffer Maximum Length: inches Minimum Aquarium Size: 20 Gallons Feeding: Meaty foods, chopped shrimp, krill, clams and squid, also vegetable matter.
The Blue Dot puffer also known as the Blue Dot Toby or Sharp-nosed Puffer is a medium maintenance fish. The Blue Dot Puffer may be aggressive at times. It may even nip the fins of tank mates, leaving a circular hole as its mark. It has fused beak-like structured teeth.
The Blue Dot Toby may also be called the Blue Dot Puffer or Blue Spotted Sharp-nosed Puffer. Members of the Canthigaster genus are called Sharp-nosed Puffers or Tobies. It lacks pelvic fins, but has learned to use the pectoral fins to move about the aquarium.
The Blue Dot Toby may also be called the Blue Dot Puffer or Blue Spotted Sharp-nosed Puffer. Members of the Canthigaster genus are called Sharp-nosed Puffers or Tobies. It lacks pelvic fins, but has learned to use the pectoral fins to move about the aquarium.
Sep 27,  · Blue Spotted Toby Puffer??? - I want a small unique colorful fish and I came across Toby puffers. My favorite is the blue spotted one but are they reef safe? I .

Sep 08,  · When I was checking on my blue spot puffer he was nowhere to be found. Guess he got lonely cuz I looked and looked like an idiot and he was just to my left area in my main tank staring at me like a puppy. Somehow he jumped out of my overflow area and up into my main tank.

Geographic Distribution Canthigaster solandri. Report Broken Video Little puffer in captivity. Jungle's YouTube Channel - Marine. View 4 Animal Stories on False-eye Puffer. Add Your Animal Story. Anonymous - I have a standard 29 gallon tank with two maroon clownfish about an inch in length.

NONE of the fish nip or have any other issues with one another. The smaller the tank, the more territorial fish are going to be, period. The order they are put into the tank can make a difference too.

I love these little puffers, they are full of personality, but be careful - mine likes to jump out of the tank any chance he gets.

Mika - I have a blue-lined toby, and although he is personable and rather easy to keep, he does take nips out of the other fishes fins. My poor sailfin tang looks scalloped now! Bill - I had a bigger Maroon clown that used to always have bits of her fin bitten off and you'd always see her chasing the puffer and anything else away from her anemones.

The poor fish had a pretty hard life and died early for other reasons. One bad winter the water temperature got pretty low and every fish died in the tank but the Maroon clown and her little partner. Then we restocked the tank and it happened a couple of weeks later and her partner died. She probably died a year or two after that.

Oh yeah, puffers are infamous for nipping. He is very reclusive and does not seem to like coming out when the tank light is on during the day, but loves to come out from the rocks at dusk and dawn, by far the most docile fish in my tank. May try him in display if he doesn't touch these snails at all.

I have an Canthigaster papua, which is very similar. Like Robin, mine has polished off most of my snails -- there is one golf ball sized "turbo" that he doesn't bother. He hasn't killed off my shrimp, yet, but they spend most of the time hiding.

Mine loved zoas, eats SPS, and nips at my fingers when I feed. Find More Posts by Toddrtrex. I have a Valentini that started out terrorizing snails but has never touched a coral.

He has gotten lazy now and won't even harass the snails, but will still go after shrimp. He has gotten so lazy about hunting food that I'll probably need to trim his teeth soon. It eventually went after corals, and then fish. When I traded it in at the pet store they had either a Solandri or Papua I can't tell the difference personally that was brought in for eating SPS. My newest one is a Caribbean Sharpnose.

It will terrorize snails and harass my Pincussion Urchins and Sea Hare but does no damage to any of them. It tries to terrorize me but I play back. If I ever need to remove it it'll be easy since when it goes to nip my hand I just grab it and pet it, then it swims off and sulks.

The key I've found is make sure it eats just about anything. A hungry Toby is a dangerous ones. When they get hungry is the time when they question what is edible. If they are willing to eat just about anything then they are less likely to ask questions about what else might be available. But it is always a toss up. I wouldn't call them reef-safe but I always wouldn't call them not reef-safe either.

I woke up this morning to admire my tank during a bowl of cereal. When I was checking on my blue spot puffer he was nowhere to be found. I have read that too, I was asking what people who have them actually feed them.

I have google as well. Mar 23, Messages: I feed mine mysis and clams. The crazy thing also eats flake, nori and pretty much anything I put in the tank. Jason McKenzie , Aug 4, Bill and Vinnyboombatz like this. Sorry I read it as you asking about the diet and how to keep the teeth short.

Bill and DSC reef like this. May 31, Messages: I always feed my puffers and triggers table shrimp shell on ,oysters,clams fully closed,open about half way and let them work a bit ,,trigger formula cubes,NLS and hikari pellet food.. Sometimes I offer fresh hermits and snails.. Usually every couple months.. FeedYourMachine , Aug 4, Jul 23, Messages: Mine was a glutton and ate everything I put in there. He never ate my CUC or other tank mates though.

The Blue Spotted Puffer may also be called the Blue Dot Toby or Blue Dot Sharp-nosed Puffer. Members of the Canthigaster genus are called Sharp-nosed Puffers or Tobies. The Blue Spotted Puffer Canthigaster solandri and the Papuan Toby Puffer Canthigaster papua have very similar characteristics. The Blue Dot puffer also known as the Blue Dot Toby or Sharp-nosed Puffer is a medium maintenance fish. The Blue Dot Puffer may be aggressive at times. It may even nip the fins of tank mates, leaving a circular hole as its mark. It has fused beak-like structured teeth. Aug 04,  · From LA:The Blue Spotted Puffer may also be called the Blue Dot Toby or Blue Dot Sharp-nosed Puffer. Members of the Canthigaster genus are called Sharp-nosed Puffers or Tobies. The Blue Spotted Puffer Canthigaster solandri and the Papuan Toby Puffer Canthigaster papua have very similar characteristics. The lack of orange coloration around the mouth of the Blue Spotted Puffer .

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